Force of Nature

By Jane Harper

Review: Some years ago I heard the term ‘brain clearing’ being used to describe books that don’t ask too much of the reader but are engaging enough to keep you anchored. I put great value in these type of books, to the point where I think they deserve their own genre. This is one of those books and can easily be read in a day. It’s clear, simple and structurally well enough written with a formula that incrementally builds the characters and story to keep you interested enough, despite it being a tad repetitive in parts. The scene of Jane Harper’s second novel is a work retreat where two groups have to hike for three days in the bush, just the place to test relationships and pick through everyone’s dysfunctional families. Predictably things don’t go to plan and we again meet Agent Aaron Falk as he solves his next case along with a few recurring characters from Harpers first novel ‘The Dry’, although each can be read independently. This is just the type of book to read when life around you is a bit crazy, you don’t want to think too hard and you just need a few moments to zone out. Don’t expect too much of it and it won’t expect too much of you.

Number of pages: 380

Genre: Crime Fiction, Brain Clearing

Blurb: What has happened to Alice Russell?

Five women reluctantly pick up their backpacks and start walking along the muddy track. Only four come out the other side.

The hike through the rugged Giralang Ranges is meant to take the office colleagues out of their air-conditioned comfort zone and teach resilience and team building. At least that is what the corporate retreat website advises.

Federal Police Agent Aaron Falk has a keen interest in the whereabouts of the missing bushwalker. Alice Russell is the whistleblower in his latest case. She knows all the secrets: about the company she works for and the people she works with.

Far from the hike encouraging teamwork, Falk is told a tale of violence and disintegrating trust. And as he delves into the disappearance, it seems some dangers run far deeper than anyone knew.

Blurb Source: Harper, J., Force of Nature, (2017), Sydney, New South Wales, Pan Macmillan Australia Pty Ltd.

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