Moby-Dick (or The Whale)

By Herman Melville

Review: Initially I was having trouble engaging with this book, repeatedly returning to the start as my reading was not doing it justice. I found an audio on Spotify, this worked by slowing down my reading and allowing me to really appreciate the breadth of mastery of the descriptive language combined with the formality of the 1800’s. There’s layers of references, some of which I grasped and some I didn’t, a richer experience for those that I did manage to connect with and awed – not frustrated – by those beyond my comprehension. Make no mistake, it’s dense, demanding, and sometimes you feel like you’re swimming through concrete, but it’s also intricate and poetic with many lines for pause, reflection and savouring. It’s filled with razor sharp observations; social commentary; character studies; philosophy; mythology; religious, scientific and historical analysis; tradition and superstition; and humanity. An epic and sophisticated book that places high expectations on its reader, yet I’m sure that the more life experience I have the more it will reward.

Pages: 625

Genre: Classics, Literary Fiction

First Published: 1851

Blurb: “It is the horrible texture of a fabric that should be woven of ships’ cables and hawsers. A Polar wind blows through it, and birds of prey hover over it.”

So Melville wrote of his masterpiece, one of the greatest works of imagination in literary history. In part, Moby-Dick is the story of an eerily compelling madman pursuing an unholy war against a creature as vast and dangerous and unknowable as the sea itself. But more than just a novel of adventure, more than an encyclopaedia of whaling lore and legend, the book can be seen as part of its author’s lifelong meditation on America. Moby-Dick can be read as a “disorderly elegy” to democracy, which Melville saw threatened on many sides: by the spirit of utilitarianism, by America’s accelerating pace of expansionism, and by the drive toward industrial power. Written with wonderfully redemptive humour, Moby-Dick is also a profound inquiry into character, faith, and the nature of perception.

Blurb Source: Melville, H., (1992), Moby-Dick, New York, Penguin

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One thought on “Moby-Dick (or The Whale)

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  1. Review: Initially I was having trouble engaging with this book, repeatedly returning to the start as my reading was not doing it justice. I found an audio on Spotify, this worked by slowing down my reading and allowing me to really appreciate the breadth of mastery of the descriptive language combined with the formality of the 1800’s. There’s layers of references, some of which I grasped and some I didn’t, a richer experience for those that I did manage to connect with and awed – not frustrated – by those beyond my comprehension. Make no mistake, it’s dense, demanding, and sometimes you feel like you’re swimming through concrete, but it’s also intricate and poetic with many lines for pause, reflection and savouring. It’s filled with razor sharp observations; social commentary; character studies; philosophy; mythology; religious, scientific and historical analysis; tradition and superstition; and humanity. An epic and sophisticated book that places high expectations on its reader, yet I’m sure that the more life experience I have the more it will reward.

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